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HP iLO Network Configuration with Linux

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Since a reader requested this due to my previous blog post about DELL iDRAC lights-out management interface.

In my opinion, HP iLO implementation is the best lights-out management technology. Now to our subject, if you happen to have HP iLO interface you will almost certainly have to deal with some ProLiant server.
The first step is to install the HP ProLiant Support Pack (HP PSP) which is a collection of utilities and drivers to manage your server from user space and it is available for all the major enterprise class operating systems.

Among others, this package includes a utility named ‘hponcfg’ that you can use for many useful tasks such as retriving host information…

[root@somewhere ~]# hponcfg -g
Firmware Revision = 2.05 Device type = iLO 2 Driver name = hpilo
Host Information:
                        Server Name: DLXXX-XXXXXXXXXX
                        Server Number: XXXXXXXXX
[root@somewhere ~]#

So, HP iLO’s configuration file can be imported or exported as an XML file. In case you have accidentally made your HP iLO interface unreachable through network, you can export its configuration file using the following command.

[root@somewhere ~]# hponcfg -a -w iloconfig.cfg
Firmware Revision = 2.05 Device type = iLO 2 Driver name = hpilo
RILOE II/iLO configuration successfully written to file "iloconfig.cfg"
[root@somewhere ~]#

Now you can edit the XML file to change any part of the HP iLO’s configuration you want. In our case, we only have to update the network setup which is defined by the following tags.

<RIB_INFO mode="write"><MOD_NETWORK_SETTINGS>
    <ENABLE_NIC VALUE="Y"/>
    <SHARED_NETWORK_PORT VALUE="N"/>
    <VLAN_ENABLED VALUE="N"/>
    
    <SPEED_AUTOSELECT VALUE="Y"/>
    <NIC_SPEED VALUE="10"/>
    <FULL_DUPLEX VALUE="N"/>
    <DHCP_ENABLE VALUE="N"/>
    <DHCP_GATEWAY VALUE="Y"/>
    <DHCP_DNS_SERVER VALUE="Y"/>
    <DHCP_WINS_SERVER VALUE="Y"/>
    <DHCP_STATIC_ROUTE VALUE="Y"/>
    <DHCP_DOMAIN_NAME VALUE="Y"/>
    <REG_WINS_SERVER VALUE="Y"/>
    <REG_DDNS_SERVER VALUE="Y"/>
    <PING_GATEWAY VALUE="N"/>
    
    <IP_ADDRESS VALUE="123.123.123.123"/>
    <SUBNET_MASK VALUE="255.255.255.0"/>
    <GATEWAY_IP_ADDRESS VALUE="123.123.123.1"/>
    <DNS_NAME VALUE="EXAMPLE-DNS-NAME"/>
    <DOMAIN_NAME VALUE=""/>
    <PRIM_DNS_SERVER VALUE="0.0.0.0"/>
    <SEC_DNS_SERVER VALUE="0.0.0.0"/>
    <TER_DNS_SERVER VALUE="0.0.0.0"/>
    <PRIM_WINS_SERVER VALUE="0.0.0.0"/>
    <SEC_WINS_SERVER VALUE="0.0.0.0"/>
    <STATIC_ROUTE_1 DEST="0.0.0.0" GATEWAY="0.0.0.0"/>
    <STATIC_ROUTE_2 DEST="0.0.0.0" GATEWAY="0.0.0.0"/>
    <STATIC_ROUTE_3 DEST="0.0.0.0" GATEWAY="0.0.0.0"/>
</MOD_NETWORK_SETTINGS></RIB_INFO>

Modify these to according to your network requirements and reload the new configuration file using the next command.

[root@somewhere ~]# hponcfg -f iloconfig_new.cfg
Firmware Revision = 2.05 Device type = iLO 2 Driver name = hpilo
<INFORM>Integrated Lights-Out will reset at the end of the script.</INFORM>
[root@somewhere ~]#

Now you can normally access your HP iLO using your web browser…

Written by xorl

August 6, 2011 at 11:20

Posted in administration, hp, linux

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